Conservationists and wildlife officials in the Malaysian state of Sabah airlifted a young female Sumatran Rhinoceros — one of the world’s most endangered animals — to an area of forest where she would encounter a potential partner, reports the Sabah Wildlife Department and Borneo Rhino Alliance. Sumatran Rhinoceros populations are so low, some individuals live in areas where they have no hope of ever finding another rhino.“This is a fantastic gift for our uphill battle in ensuring the survival of this truly unique species and wonderful timing with Christmas, a time to give thanks for our blessings,” said Laurentius Ambu the Director of the SWD.“We have monitored her since 2007, and there is no sign that any other rhino has entered her range in the past five years,” added Junaidi Payne the Executive Director of Borneo Rhino Alliance. “This is a stark indication that so few rhinos remain that they are simply not meeting for reproduction.”The rhino, named Puntung, was moved within Tabin Wildlife Reserve to be close to Tam, a middle-aged rhino rescued from an oil palm plantation in August 2008. Sumatran rhinos are critically endangered due to habitat destruction and poaching. Small populations live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo — but the number of Bornean rhinos remaining is less than 40.Conservationists in Sabah are pushing a plan that would involve moving several rhinos to the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary, a large enclosed area covering 20 hectares of natural forest located within Tabin Wildlife Reserve. A similar program is underway in Sumatra.“This is now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient forms of mammal,” said Laurentius. “We need collaboration and support in our efforts to prevent the extinction of this unique species that was once found in abundance.”Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1224-rhino_translocation.html#ixzz1iKIkk2WA

Conservationists and wildlife officials in the Malaysian state of Sabah airlifted a young female Sumatran Rhinoceros — one of the world’s most endangered animals — to an area of forest where she would encounter a potential partner, reports the Sabah Wildlife Department and Borneo Rhino Alliance. Sumatran Rhinoceros populations are so low, some individuals live in areas where they have no hope of ever finding another rhino.

“This is a fantastic gift for our uphill battle in ensuring the survival of this truly unique species and wonderful timing with Christmas, a time to give thanks for our blessings,” said Laurentius Ambu the Director of the SWD.

“We have monitored her since 2007, and there is no sign that any other rhino has entered her range in the past five years,” added Junaidi Payne the Executive Director of Borneo Rhino Alliance. “This is a stark indication that so few rhinos remain that they are simply not meeting for reproduction.”

The rhino, named Puntung, was moved within Tabin Wildlife Reserve to be close to Tam, a middle-aged rhino rescued from an oil palm plantation in August 2008. Sumatran rhinos are critically endangered due to habitat destruction and poaching. Small populations live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo — but the number of Bornean rhinos remaining is less than 40.

Conservationists in Sabah are pushing a plan that would involve moving several rhinos to the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary, a large enclosed area covering 20 hectares of natural forest located within Tabin Wildlife Reserve. A similar program is underway in Sumatra.

“This is now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient forms of mammal,” said Laurentius. “We need collaboration and support in our efforts to prevent the extinction of this unique species that was once found in abundance.”

Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1224-rhino_translocation.html#ixzz1iKIkk2WA

Amazing measures taken by south african conservationists! 


Western black rhino declared extinct
The Red List, drawn up by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), has declared the subspecies extinct.
A subspecies of white rhino in central Africa is also listed as possibly extinct, the organisation says.
The annual update of the Red List now records more threatened species than ever before.
The IUCN reports that despite conservation efforts, 25% of the world’s mammals are at risk of extinction. As part of its latest work it has reassessed several rhinoceros groups.

Western black rhino declared extinct

The Red List, drawn up by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), has declared the subspecies extinct.

A subspecies of white rhino in central Africa is also listed as possibly extinct, the organisation says.

The annual update of the Red List now records more threatened species than ever before.

The IUCN reports that despite conservation efforts, 25% of the world’s mammals are at risk of extinction. As part of its latest work it has reassessed several rhinoceros groups.

sexyactionplanet:

 
Javan rhino ‘now extinct in Vietnam’
 
A critically endangered species of rhino is now extinct in Vietnam, according to a report by conservation groups.
The WWF and the International Rhino Foundation said the country’s last Javan rhino was probably killed by poachers, as its horn had been cut off.
Fewer than 50 individuals are now estimated to remain in the wild.

sexyactionplanet:

Javan rhino ‘now extinct in Vietnam’

A critically endangered species of rhino is now extinct in Vietnam, according to a report by conservation groups.

The WWF and the International Rhino Foundation said the country’s last Javan rhino was probably killed by poachers, as its horn had been cut off.

Fewer than 50 individuals are now estimated to remain in the wild.