The first California condors to enter the wild in 5 years took a few hesitant hops on a sandstone cliff, craned pinkish necks over the precipice and tentatively tested their nine-foot-plus wings. Since that land mark launch in 1992, wildlife biologists have released nearly 200 condors that were born and raised in captivity, and they have prospered! The world population has rebounded from 22 in 1987 to 396 birds, with wild populations concentrated in  Baja California, Arizona, and southern and central California. As these giant scavengers move to reoccupy their full 7 million square mile range, scientists are using state of the art technology to guide the Pleistocene period survivors toward full self sustainability. They are counting on this and other unusual inventions, such as swapping infertile for fertile eggs, to ensure their full recovery. 
Jesse Grantham, coordinator of the US fish and wildlife service’s condor recovery programme can track every 17 pound and over bird using radio transmitters and solar powered GPS. These send 1000 locator points per day, if a bird stays in one place for too long it usually means they are in trouble. A rescue team is scrambled to trek through remote canyons go and help the condor. The traking also allows scientists to determine where important breeding caves are and ensure they are protected.
The main threat to Condors remains the same as it did 25 years ago, lead bullet fragments that lodge in the bodies of carrion. Some nine out of 10 condors have elevated lead levels, a problem that persists despite a ban on the use of lead bullets within the condor habitat in California. Bottle caps, DDT, high voltage power lines and the occasional shooting also contribute, which means the environment still presents “all the mortality factors that nearly caused their extinction.
With the telemetry records, scientists and conservationists are working to remove what dangers they can from the birds range. If only something could be done about the lead. 

The first California condors to enter the wild in 5 years took a few hesitant hops on a sandstone cliff, craned pinkish necks over the precipice and tentatively tested their nine-foot-plus wings. Since that land mark launch in 1992, wildlife biologists have released nearly 200 condors that were born and raised in captivity, and they have prospered! The world population has rebounded from 22 in 1987 to 396 birds, with wild populations concentrated in  Baja California, Arizona, and southern and central California. As these giant scavengers move to reoccupy their full 7 million square mile range, scientists are using state of the art technology to guide the Pleistocene period survivors toward full self sustainability. They are counting on this and other unusual inventions, such as swapping infertile for fertile eggs, to ensure their full recovery. 

Jesse Grantham, coordinator of the US fish and wildlife service’s condor recovery programme can track every 17 pound and over bird using radio transmitters and solar powered GPS. These send 1000 locator points per day, if a bird stays in one place for too long it usually means they are in trouble. A rescue team is scrambled to trek through remote canyons go and help the condor. The traking also allows scientists to determine where important breeding caves are and ensure they are protected.

The main threat to Condors remains the same as it did 25 years ago, lead bullet fragments that lodge in the bodies of carrion. Some nine out of 10 condors have elevated lead levels, a problem that persists despite a ban on the use of lead bullets within the condor habitat in California. Bottle caps, DDT, high voltage power lines and the occasional shooting also contribute, which means the environment still presents “all the mortality factors that nearly caused their extinction.

With the telemetry records, scientists and conservationists are working to remove what dangers they can from the birds range. If only something could be done about the lead. 

Where our plastic could end up

Last chance for little bird

Conservationists have set off on a last-ditch rescue bid to save one of the world’s rarest and shyest birds – the tiny spoon-billed sandpiper – from extinction.
In the remote far east of Russia, near the Chukotka region, the team hopes to catch sight of some of the few pairs remaining. Between 120 and 200 pairs were believed to be still alive when last surveyed in 2009, but that figure could be as low as 60 pairs today – if not lower, as the bird is very difficult to spot.

Last chance for little bird

Conservationists have set off on a last-ditch rescue bid to save one of the world’s rarest and shyest birds – the tiny spoon-billed sandpiper – from extinction.

In the remote far east of Russia, near the Chukotka region, the team hopes to catch sight of some of the few pairs remaining. Between 120 and 200 pairs were believed to be still alive when last surveyed in 2009, but that figure could be as low as 60 pairs today – if not lower, as the bird is very difficult to spot.

On the edge of extinction, Philippine eagles being picked off one-by-one
Down to a few hundred individuals, every Philippine eagle is important if the species is to survive. However, the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) has recently announced that people continue to illegally trap and keep eagles captive. Since December the organization has taken-in four confiscated Philippine eagles, Pithecophaga jefferyi, according to The Philippine Star. One died of a fungal infection after confiscation, while two others has suffered serious injuries. 

On the edge of extinction, Philippine eagles being picked off one-by-one

Down to a few hundred individuals, every Philippine eagle is important if the species is to survive. However, the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) has recently announced that people continue to illegally trap and keep eagles captive. Since December the organization has taken-in four confiscated Philippine eagles, Pithecophaga jefferyi, according to The Philippine Star. One died of a fungal infection after confiscation, while two others has suffered serious injuries.