Conservationists and wildlife officials in the Malaysian state of Sabah airlifted a young female Sumatran Rhinoceros — one of the world’s most endangered animals — to an area of forest where she would encounter a potential partner, reports the Sabah Wildlife Department and Borneo Rhino Alliance. Sumatran Rhinoceros populations are so low, some individuals live in areas where they have no hope of ever finding another rhino.“This is a fantastic gift for our uphill battle in ensuring the survival of this truly unique species and wonderful timing with Christmas, a time to give thanks for our blessings,” said Laurentius Ambu the Director of the SWD.“We have monitored her since 2007, and there is no sign that any other rhino has entered her range in the past five years,” added Junaidi Payne the Executive Director of Borneo Rhino Alliance. “This is a stark indication that so few rhinos remain that they are simply not meeting for reproduction.”The rhino, named Puntung, was moved within Tabin Wildlife Reserve to be close to Tam, a middle-aged rhino rescued from an oil palm plantation in August 2008. Sumatran rhinos are critically endangered due to habitat destruction and poaching. Small populations live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo — but the number of Bornean rhinos remaining is less than 40.Conservationists in Sabah are pushing a plan that would involve moving several rhinos to the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary, a large enclosed area covering 20 hectares of natural forest located within Tabin Wildlife Reserve. A similar program is underway in Sumatra.“This is now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient forms of mammal,” said Laurentius. “We need collaboration and support in our efforts to prevent the extinction of this unique species that was once found in abundance.”Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1224-rhino_translocation.html#ixzz1iKIkk2WA

Conservationists and wildlife officials in the Malaysian state of Sabah airlifted a young female Sumatran Rhinoceros — one of the world’s most endangered animals — to an area of forest where she would encounter a potential partner, reports the Sabah Wildlife Department and Borneo Rhino Alliance. Sumatran Rhinoceros populations are so low, some individuals live in areas where they have no hope of ever finding another rhino.

“This is a fantastic gift for our uphill battle in ensuring the survival of this truly unique species and wonderful timing with Christmas, a time to give thanks for our blessings,” said Laurentius Ambu the Director of the SWD.

“We have monitored her since 2007, and there is no sign that any other rhino has entered her range in the past five years,” added Junaidi Payne the Executive Director of Borneo Rhino Alliance. “This is a stark indication that so few rhinos remain that they are simply not meeting for reproduction.”

The rhino, named Puntung, was moved within Tabin Wildlife Reserve to be close to Tam, a middle-aged rhino rescued from an oil palm plantation in August 2008. Sumatran rhinos are critically endangered due to habitat destruction and poaching. Small populations live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo — but the number of Bornean rhinos remaining is less than 40.

Conservationists in Sabah are pushing a plan that would involve moving several rhinos to the Borneo Rhino Sanctuary, a large enclosed area covering 20 hectares of natural forest located within Tabin Wildlife Reserve. A similar program is underway in Sumatra.

“This is now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient forms of mammal,” said Laurentius. “We need collaboration and support in our efforts to prevent the extinction of this unique species that was once found in abundance.”

Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2011/1224-rhino_translocation.html#ixzz1iKIkk2WA

Australian ‘green’ buildings used illegally logged wood from rainforests allege activists
A ‘green’ building development being built by Frasers Property Australia in Sydney has been accused of using illegally-sourced plywood from Malaysian state of Sarawak in Borneo, according to a new Greenpeace report. The wood in question comes from a subsidiary of Samling, a company that has been connected to illegal logging and abusing the rights of indigenous groups in the past. After the revelations came to light, Frasers Property Australia said they would conduct an audit of the wood which was provided to them by Australian Wood Panels (AWP). 

Australian ‘green’ buildings used illegally logged wood from rainforests allege activists

A ‘green’ building development being built by Frasers Property Australia in Sydney has been accused of using illegally-sourced plywood from Malaysian state of Sarawak in Borneo, according to a new Greenpeace report. The wood in question comes from a subsidiary of Samling, a company that has been connected to illegal logging and abusing the rights of indigenous groups in the past. After the revelations came to light, Frasers Property Australia said they would conduct an audit of the wood which was provided to them by Australian Wood Panels (AWP). 

Illeagal pet trade threatens tiny primate
Researchers in the Malaysian state of Sabah recently radio-collared a Bornean slow loris (Nycticebus menagensis) in order to study the little known species. A small, but big-eyed, primates slow loris spend the days sleeping and the night tracking prey, such as insects and lizards, with its large flashlight-like eyes. The study is being led by the Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) and Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC). 
Classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List, the Bornean slow loris is thought to be rare throughout its range, which extends to several islands beyond Borneo. The primate is threatened, like many species in the area, by deforestation. However the species is also a target of the illegal pet trade. "Although slow lorises are protected by law from international and commercial trade, the greatest growing threat to slow lorises is the illegal pet trade, being the second most common primate species owned as pets in Asia, next to macaques," explained Dr Laurentius Ambu, Director of the Sabah Wildlife Department, in a press release. "They have also become an important species for medicinal and ornamental trade. Lorises face extremely high mortality rates in markets and transport of them, due to starvation, dehydration and infections from dental health injuries, as their teeth are removed to increase their sales," added Ambu. 

Illeagal pet trade threatens tiny primate

Researchers in the Malaysian state of Sabah recently radio-collared a Bornean slow loris (Nycticebus menagensis) in order to study the little known species. A small, but big-eyed, primates slow loris spend the days sleeping and the night tracking prey, such as insects and lizards, with its large flashlight-like eyes. The study is being led by the Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) and Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC). 


Classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List, the Bornean slow loris is thought to be rare throughout its range, which extends to several islands beyond Borneo. The primate is threatened, like many species in the area, by deforestation. However the species is also a target of the illegal pet trade. 

"Although slow lorises are protected by law from international and commercial trade, the greatest growing threat to slow lorises is the illegal pet trade, being the second most common primate species owned as pets in Asia, next to macaques," explained Dr Laurentius Ambu, Director of the Sabah Wildlife Department, in a press release. "They have also become an important species for medicinal and ornamental trade. Lorises face extremely high mortality rates in markets and transport of them, due to starvation, dehydration and infections from dental health injuries, as their teeth are removed to increase their sales," added Ambu. 

Sarawak’s leader under investigation for corruption linked to logging
In his 30 years of rule over Sarawak, the western-most state in Malaysian Borneo, Taib has had enjoyed close ties with the logging sector. During that time, Taib and his family members have amassed hundreds of millions of dollars in overseas properties. Campaigners allege the holdings are a direct product of his links to the forestry industry, which has inflicted heavy damage on state’s rainforest and run roughshod over the rights of traditional forest dwellers, including the once-nomadic Penan. Taib has at times resorted to force in breaking up protests by the Penan against logging and oil palm plantation development. He has also greatly restricted press freedoms in the state. 

Sarawak’s leader under investigation for corruption linked to logging

In his 30 years of rule over Sarawak, the western-most state in Malaysian Borneo, Taib has had enjoyed close ties with the logging sector. During that time, Taib and his family members have amassed hundreds of millions of dollars in overseas properties. Campaigners allege the holdings are a direct product of his links to the forestry industry, which has inflicted heavy damage on state’s rainforest and run roughshod over the rights of traditional forest dwellers, including the once-nomadic Penan. Taib has at times resorted to force in breaking up protests by the Penan against logging and oil palm plantation development. He has also greatly restricted press freedoms in the state.